Strategic Lawsuit Against Public Participation

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia:
A strategic lawsuit against public participation (SLAPP) is a lawsuit that is intended to censor, intimidate, and silence critics by burdening them with the cost of a legal defense until they abandon their criticism or opposition.[1] Such lawsuits have been made illegal in many jurisdictions on the grounds that they impede freedom of speech.
The typical SLAPP plaintiff does not normally expect to win the lawsuit. The plaintiff's goals are accomplished if the defendant succumbs to fear, intimidation, mounting legal costs, or simple exhaustion and abandons the criticism. In some cases, repeated frivolous litigation against a defendant may raise the cost of directors and officers liability insurance for that party, interfering with an organization's ability to operate. A SLAPP may also intimidate others from participating in the debate. A SLAPP is often preceded by a legal threat.

The Lake Point Project claimed to be the key to saving the Everglades, the Loxahatchee River and the Indian River Lagoon.
I have loudly and publicly pointed out that it doesn’t save the Everglades, the Loxahatchee or the Lagoon.
Lake Point sued SFWMD because they said it is a breach of contract not to let them sell water.
They sued Martin County because the County was enforcing its land development regulations. Lake Point claimed they were exempt.
The SFWMD and Martin County succumbed to fear, intimidation, mounting legal costs – and political pressure – and settled with Lake Point. They cost their taxpayers millions. They set a precedent that if you bully them and pressure them long enough they will give you everything you want.

I do not intend to succumb.
Someone has to stand up to bullies.
I am anxious to get to trial to prove that citizens and their governments can’t be slapped around.